Scots Pine Trees - Used as Xmas trees and door frames

Scots Pine Trees - uses and brief history.

Scots pine trees are a versatile softwood tree that has numerous uses including as a "Christmas tree" not least as it retains its needles well, the history of xmas trees in the UK is well documented.

Scots Pines can be over 300 years old and can grow up to 36 metres tall and 1.5 metres around the trunk, not a size that would suit most homes.

Native and foreign birds, not least the Great Spotted Woodpecker and Crossbill feed around a Scots Pine and in Scotland the Capercaille are found living in some pine forests.

The timber is known as “redwood” or “red deal” is easy to work with and is a reasonably strong timber with a light weight.


                           A Type 3 Model Frame made to size by


Pine is used in many parts of the home including roof timbers, stairs, door frames and skirting and It looks attractive making it popular for furniture construction while on a more industrial note it is also used as telegraph poles, fences and paper pulp.

The Scots pine makes good firewood with a nice smell and is still used in some parts of the country for pit props in mines.

Old uses - This is a good tree for being in contact with water so in the past it was used to make ships, ship masts and water wheels while the resin from the bark was used to make tar and turpentine while another product was charcoal.

Some of the above and more information can be found on the following site,

Remember a tree is for Xmas not for life.

Edited by Chippy