How to choose glass for a door - DIY Tip 18

How to choose glass for a door

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                                          "Chippy" can do it all!

You should always purchase the correct level of obscuration for the intended purpose, don't choose glass such as clear glass for a bathroom. For example, make sure the glass is not easy to see through if what you want is a glass that breaks up the image as much as possible.

The patterned glass images on the site show a 'vase' or a 'clock face' behind them to give you some idea of how easy the glass is to see through, ie; the obscuration level.

Always choose glass that complies with safety regulations, if the glass is set at a low level ask if it needs to be toughened safety glass or laminated safety glass, in virtually all locations it will need to be one of the two options.

The most opaque patterned glass which we sell is Cotswold, followed by Sycamore, Stippolyte, Autumn Leaf and Flemish.

There are other patterns listed on the site but these are only suitable for toughened double glazing or toughened single thickness panes, not all doors are suitable for this thickness of glass, the site offers the glass which is best suited to your chosen door.

The most opaque of these mentioned in the paragraph directly above are Contora followed by Pelerine, Mayflower, Taffeta, Florielle, Oak, Digital, Charcoal sticks and Chantilly. We also recommend Sandblasted glass which is very opaque.

All these glass types allow the light to flow through. When glazing any door that will be subject to weather conditions (external doors) always use a non-setting compound or a gasket system, never use linseed oil putty as it marks the door and does not offer a good enough seal.

Remember; Always set the smooth side of patterned glass to the outside and always set the beads (which hold the glass in place) to the inside of the door, when fitting double glazing both faces will be smooth.

Any questions, email and ask "Chippy"

Edited by "Chippy" for