Timber Commonly Grown in the United States of America - DIY tip 40

  Info supplied by www.directdoors.com/   Edited by "Chippy" for DirectDoors.com



There are approximately 48 or more different species of hardwood grown in the United States of America, there are also approximately 25 or more Softwood species also grown.

A total of more than 73 differing timber species, some are used for basic construction, such as stud partitions, flooring, wall panelling etc, others are used for more traditional finishing work such as Skirtings, Architraves, Doors etc and more species are used for various sports including Baseball, Rowing and Cricket to name but a few.

The more popular of the timber species are as follows, I have not listed them by popularity or quanity grown/cultivated;

Hardwoods; Ash, American Beech, Elm, True Hickory, Soft Maple, Red Oak, White Oak, American Sycamore,  Tupelo, Black Walnut, Black Willow, Yellow Poplar, Basswood, Buckeye, American Chestnut, Birch, Black Cherry, Hackberry, Hard Maple, Oregon Ash, Red Alder, Paper Birch and Cottonwood, to name but a few as the saying goes.  

Softwoods; Douglas Fir, White Firs, Western Hemlock, Ponderosa Pine, Western Red Cedar, Redwood, Engelman Spruce, Balsam Fir, Jack Pine, Tamarack and Eastern White Pine, again just a few of the range available.

There is nothing as reliable, renewable and useable and reusable as timber, you can grow it again and again, you can cut it, shape it, decorate it and burn it, it can last for hundreds of years and when all is said and done you can then repair it when it does go wrong.

If timber had never been heard of and someone was to invent just such a product we would all be in awe of it, it is truly an amazing product and beautiful with it.

I have worked with timber for longer than I care to mention, the smell of timbers such as pine being machined is just fantastic, it almost makes you want to eat it.

The whole point of supplying this as a DIY tip is so that you may begin to realise that there are just so many options for using timber, just make sure that you always check what the moisture content is for anyone making things for using inside the home, such as doors etc, the moisture content of timber should be lower for interior projects and higher for exterior.

We select the best timber we can to make our bespoke doors, we hope you sample them someday.  



Info supplied by www.directdoors.com 

Any questions, email info@directdoors.com and ask "Chippy"